Dancecult: Journal of Electronic Dance Music Culture

Dancecult: Electronic Dance Music Culture Research Network

With its doors having opened in April 2005 Dancecult is an electronic forum and journal for the electronic dance music culture (EDMC) research network.

Dancecult-l is an interdisciplinary mailing list for scholars, graduate students, and other parties interested in the study and documentation of EDMCs from proto-disco, techno and trance, through post-rave formations. Dancecult incorporates a bibliography, links to other relevant web-based resources and events, a list of scholars researching EDMC, and other mysterious developments. Thanks to the design skills of Eliot Bates, the website enables visitors to make additions and updates.

As a critical information exchange hub, Dancecult enables resource sharing and collaboration between international researchers of club cultures, raves, techno, electronica, doof, digital arts and other manifestations of EDMC. Members come from various different disciplines, operating in many different global locations, employing diverse methodologies.

Join Dancecult-l

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Dancecult Background

Dancecult emerged as an extension of the Dancecult network hub at www.dancecult.net (the network hub is currently down). It uses the Open Journal Systems software developed by the Public Knowledge Project, has an advisory board of international experts, and volunteers who form its editorial and production team. Since Jan 2013, Dancecult has been hosted by Griffith University's ePress in association with the Griffith Centre for Cultural Research.

Dancecult is a peer-reviewed, open-access e-journal for the study of electronic dance music culture (EDMC). A platform for interdisciplinary scholarship on the shifting terrain of EDMCs worldwide, the journal houses research exploring the sites, technologies, sounds and cultures of electronic music in historical and contemporary perspectives. Playing host to studies of emergent forms of electronic music production, performance, distribution, and reception, as a portal for cutting-edge research on the relation between bodies, technologies, and cyberspace, as a medium through which the cultural politics of dance is critically investigated, and as a venue for innovative multimedia projects, Dancecult is the forum for research on EDMCs.

From dancehall to raving, club cultures to sound systems, disco to techno, breakbeat to psytrance, hip hop to dub-step, IDM to noisecore, nortec to bloghouse, global EDMCs are a shifting spectrum of scenes, genres, and aesthetics. What is the role of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, religion and spirituality in these formations? How have technologies, mind alterants, and popular culture conditioned this proliferation, and how has electronic music filtered into cinema, literature and everyday life? How does existing critical theory enable understanding of EDMCs, and how might the latter challenge the assumptions of our inherited heuristics? What is the role of the DJ in diverse genres, scenes, subcultures, and/or neotribes? As the journal of the international EDMC research network, Dancecult welcomes submissions from scholars addressing these and related inquiries across all disciplines.

Submissions: The journal features a fully electronic submission and reviewing procedure. Once you have logged in and registered as an author you are able to submit content to the journal by clicking on “Author” in your “User Home” column. Once submitted, you are able to track the status of your submission.

Journal Sections:

Besides editorials, featured articles (6000-9000 words), and book/ film / conference and symposium reviews (1500 words), Dancecult publishes “From the Floor” articles.This section hosts imaginative submissions reviewed by Dancecult editors (that is, submissions are not typically subject to blind peer-review). Submissions include field reports, mini-ethnographies, photo-essays and interviews. Pieces for this section should be between 750-2500 words in length. Rather than written in the style of an article with formal analysis and many citations, FTF pieces are more conversational or blog-like in style, and may consist of experimental and creative reportage styles across the field of EDM. They may include substantive multimedia components.

Solicited by the editors, Dancecult also features Conversations designed to provoke dialogue concerning contemporary issues in the field.

Dancecult is published biannually.

Submissions

Dancecult features a fully electronic submission and reviewing procedure. Once you have logged in and registered as an author you will be able to submit content to the journal by clicking on “Author” in your “User Home” column. Once submitted, you are able to track the status of your submission.

 

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